Compare anti corruption laws by country or state

5 Feb

 

  

Money: learn to live decently with very little and be part of your community to give and receive help when needed; Sex: learn more about relationship to have all you need/want/is healthy; Power: study ethics to avoid abuses because they will turn against you and destroy you in the end. I would add Food: study nutrition and stay healthy.

 

 

 True:?    

 

 

To date, Global Integrity has conducted six rounds of research on the United States — including three rounds of the Global Integrity Report, two Local Integrity Initiatives, and one round on Money, Politics, and Transparency.

Global Integrity Report

The Global Integrity Report is an essential guide to anti-corruption institutions and mechanisms around the world, intended to help policymakers, advocates, journalists and citizens identify and anticipate the areas where corruption is more likely to occur within the public sector. The Report evaluates both anti-corruption legal frameworks and the practical implementation and enforcement of those frameworks, and takes a close look at whether citizen can effectively access and use anti-corruption safeguards.

Local Integrity Initiative

While most of Global Integrity’s assessments are national in nature, for some projects research is conducted at sub-national levels. The State Integrity Investigation is a collaboration with the Center for Public Integrity that assesses corruption risks in all fifty US states.

Money, Politics and Transparency

The Money, Politics and Transparency research was conducted on a set of “Campaign Finance Indicators” designed to assess the current state of political finance transparency and regulation in 54 countries. The MPT research was undertaken to provide fresh data for understanding the relative strengths and weaknesses in global practices around political finance regulation, transparency and enforcement.

  • MPT 2014 ->

    United States of America

    In law
    71
    In practice
    67

    In the United States, direct public funding is available only for presidential candidates, and only if they pledge to abide by spending caps and eschew the collection of other sources of funding. As such, during the 2012 elections, state funds were disbursed only to minor party candidates, as the major party candidates chose to raise and spend more money than they would have received by retaining their eligibility for public funding. No indirect funding or subsidized access to advertising exists. The use of non-financial state resources in campaigns is prohibited, but in at least a few cases, such resources were abused for electoral purposes during recent campaigns. Various restrictions on direct contributions are specified in law, but campaign spending remains unrestricted. This leads to hugely expensive elections in which parties and candidates rely heavily on private donations, many of which come from large individual donors and political action committees. The US system has rigorous reporting requirements. Both candidates and parties must, by law, report regularly on their finances. In practice, the reports filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) include all direct contributions received. All filed reports are available online in machine readable formats, and are easily accessible to the public. Some third party actors are required to submit detailed financial reports to the FEC. Others, however, including are under no such obligations (see indicator #34 for a complete explanation). This means that, in practice, some information on the independent political activities of third party actors is available to the public, but much of their expenditures, and the donors who finance them, remain dark. The FEC is in charge of regulating political finance. Its members, in practice, are appointed on a partisan basis, and their independence is not guaranteed. The FEC carried out a number of audits after the 2012 elections, and imposed sanctions, some of which were complied with. Most sanctions, however, are relatively light, and are imposed well after the violation occurred, which diminishes their impact. To impose sanctions or initiate an investigation, the FEC needs a quorum of 4 of its 6 members. Three of the commissioners are Republicans and three are left-leaning. As such, they often gridlock, which means that a good deal of potential violations go without investigation. Serious concerns about the FEC’s ability to meaningfully regulate political finance exist, and dark money appears to play an increasing role in American politics.

 

 

   

   True?:

 

 True?:  True:?  

Money: learn to live decently with very little and be part of your community to give and receive help when needed; Sex: learn more about relationship to have all you need/want/is healthy; Power: study ethics to avoid abuses because they will turn against you and destroy you in the end. I would add Food: study nutrition and stay healthy.

Image result for Bribery and Corruption Law

To date, Global Integrity has conducted five rounds of research on Romania — including four rounds of the Global Integrity Report and one round on Money, Politics, and Transparency.

 

Global Integrity Report

The Global Integrity Report is an essential guide to anti-corruption institutions and mechanisms around the world, intended to help policymakers, advocates, journalists and citizens identify and anticipate the areas where corruption is more likely to occur within the public sector. The Report evaluates both anti-corruption legal frameworks and the practical implementation and enforcement of those frameworks, and takes a close look at whether citizen can effectively access and use anti-corruption safeguards.

Money, Politics and Transparency

The Money, Politics and Transparency research was conducted on a set of “Campaign Finance Indicators” designed to assess the current state of political finance transparency and regulation in 54 countries. The MPT research was undertaken to provide fresh data for understanding the relative strengths and weaknesses in global practices around political finance regulation, transparency and enforcement.

 

->

Romania

In law
78
In practice
43

In Romania, parties, in law and in practice, receive direct public funding. Indirect funding, in the form of free access to advertising on public media, is granted to both parties and candidates. Other, non-financial state resources, however, are frequently abused for campaign purposes in Romania. Contributions to both candidates and parties are highly regulated, and electoral spending is capped for both actors as well. Despite the extensive legal framework in this regard, parties elude the legally specified limits on contribution and expenditure in various ways. Reporting requirements in Romania mandate that all parties and candidates file financial reports during campaigns; only parties must report outside of campaigns. Despite legal requirements, in practice, the names of contributors are regularly excluded from reports. All submitted financial information, however, is made available online in pdf formats. Third party actors, especially NGOs that are closely tied to particular parties, are involved in election campaigns, but their independent political activities are not subject to any regulation. The Electoral Permanent Authority (AEP) oversees political finance. Its appointees are highly politicized, but there are some in practice guarantees in place to protect their independence. The AEP is active in its oversight role, as it carries out investigations and imposes sanctions, despite having some budgeting and staffing constraints. Offenders usually comply with the sanctions imposed, but repeat offenders occasionally appear.

 

   True?:

 

 

 

  Image result for Examples of Power and Corruption

Image result for Examples of Power and Corruption

Since 2006, Global Integrity has conducted research on the following countries or territories. Select a country to review the list of research and reports we have released.

 

Countries & Territories covered – http://www.globalintegrity.org

 

Looking to create your own chart or map? We recommend visiting the World Bank’s Actionable Governance Indicators (AGI) Data Portal, where you can use a variety of sophisticated interfaces to crunch some of our national-level (Global Integrity Report) numbers.

International Datasets

Learning to Open Government
Case studies and comparative analysis examining how the Open Government Partnership is playing out, in practice, in five countries.

Comparative Analysis
– Learning to Open Government (brief)
– Learning to Open Government (full)

Case Studies
Albania
Costa Rica
Mexico
The Philippines
Tanzania

 

Money, Politics & Transparency – Campaign Finance Indicators
The complete dataset, findings methods and practices for the Money, Politics & Transparency report. See full report…

Report Data 2014 (XLS)(CSV)
Key Findings 2014 Brief (PDF)
Key Findings 2014 (PDF)
Methodology White Paper 2014 (PDF)

Africa Integrity Indicators
The complete dataset, findings methods and practices for the Money, Politics & Transparency report. See full report…

AII Data
2013 (XLS)
2014 (XLS)
2015 (XLS)
2016 (XLS)
2014-2016 Combined (XLS)
AII Project & Methodology description (PDF) (PDF)

Sub-National and Sector Datasets

U.S. State Integrity Investigation. See full report…
2015 Data Site
Methodology
2012 Data (XLS)
Methodology (PDF)

Philippines Local Government Assessments. See full report…
2011 Data (XLS)

Papua New Guinea Provincial Healthcare. See full report…
2011 Data (XLS)

Kenya City Integrity Report. See full report…
2011 Data (XLS)
Methodology (PDF)

Guatemala Justice Sector Assessment. See full report…
2010 Data (XLS)
Methodology (Spanish) (PDF)

Liberia Local Governance Toolkit. See full report…
2008 Data (XLS)
Methodology (PDF)

Sub-National Governance: Argentina, Ecuador, Peru. See full report…
Methodology (PDF)

 

Downloads – http://www.globalintegrity.org

 

    

  

 

True:?

Is Iran walking the talk:? 

 

==

 

==

Countries/Jurisdictions
of Primary Concern
Countries/Jurisdictions
of Concern
Other Countries/Jurisdictions
Monitored
Afghanistan Latvia Albania Marshall Islands Andorra Maldives
Antigua and Barbuda Lebanon Algeria Moldova Anguilla Mali
Argentina Liechtenstein Angola Monaco Armenia Malta
Australia Luxembourg Aruba Mongolia Benin Mauritania
Austria Macau Azerbaijan Montenegro Bermuda Mauritius
Bahamas Mexico Bahrain Morocco Botswana Micronesia FS
Belize Netherlands Bangladesh Nicaragua Brunei Montserrat
Bolivia Nigeria Barbados Peru Burkina Faso Mozambique
Brazil Pakistan Belarus Poland Burundi Namibia
British Virgin Islands Panama Belgium Portugal Cameroon Nauru
Burma Paraguay Bosnia and Herzegovina Qatar Cape Verde Nepal
Cambodia Philippines Bulgaria Romania Central African Republic New Zealand
Canada Russia Chile Saudi Arabia Chad Niger
Cayman Islands Singapore Comoros Senegal Congo, Dem Rep of Niue
China, People Rep Somalia Cook Islands Serbia Congo, Rep of Norway
Colombia Spain Cote d’Ivoire Seychelles Croatia Oman
Costa Rica St. Maarten Czech Republic Sierra Leone Cuba Palau
Curacao Switzerland Djibouti Slovakia Denmark Papua New Guinea
Cyprus Taiwan Ecuador South Africa Dominica Rwanda
Dominican Republic Thailand Egypt St. Kitts and Nevis Equatorial Guinea Samoa
France Turkey El Salvador St. Lucia Eritrea San Marino
Germany Ukraine Ghana St. Vincent Estonia Sao Tome & Principe
Greece United Arab Emirates Gibraltar Suriname Ethiopia Slovenia
Guatemala United Kingdom Grenada Syria Fiji Solomon Islands
Guernsey United States Guyana Tanzania Finland South Sudan
Guinea Bissau Uruguay Holy See Trinidad and Tobago Gabon Sri Lanka
Haiti Venezuela Honduras Turks and Caicos Gambia Sudan
Hong Kong Zimbabwe Hungary Vanuatu Georgia Swaziland
India Ireland Vietnam Guinea Sweden
Indonesia Jamaica Yemen Iceland Tajikistan
Iran Jordan Kyrgyz Republic Timor-Leste
Iraq Kazakhstan Lesotho Togo
Isle of Man Korea, North Liberia Tonga
Israel Korea, South Libya Tunisia
Italy Kosovo Lithuania Turkmenistan
Japan Kuwait Macedonia Uganda
Jersey Laos Madagascar Uzbekistan
Kenya Malaysia Malawi Zambia

https://www.state.gov/j/inl/rls/nrcrpt/2012/vol2/184112.htm

 

https://www.state.gov/j/inl/rls/nrcrpt/2012/vol2/184113.htm

“Y” is meant to indicate that appropriate legislation has been enacted to address the captioned items. It does not imply full compliance with international standards. Please see the individual country reports for information on any deficiencies in the adopted laws/regulations.

-Actions by Governments

Criminalized Drug Money Laundering

Criminalized ML Beyond Drugs

Know-Your-Customer Provisions

Report Large Transactions

Report Suspicious Transactions (YPN)

Maintain Records Over Time

Disclosure Protection – “Safe Harbor”

Criminalize “Tipping Off”

Cross-Border Transportation of Currency

Financial Intelligence Unit (*)

Intl Law Enforcement Cooperation

System for Identifying/Forfeiting Assets

Arrangements for Asset Sharing

Criminalized Financing of Terrorism

Report Suspected Terrorist Financing

Ability to Freeze Terrorist Assets w/o Delay

States Party to 1988 UN Drug Convention

States Party to Intl. Terror Finance Conv.

States Party to UNTOC

States Party to UNCAC

US or Intl Org Sanctions/Penalties

-Country/Jurisdiction

Afghanistan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Albania

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Algeria

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Andorra

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Angola

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y*

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Anguilla[1]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Antigua andBarbuda

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Argentina

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Armenia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Aruba[2]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Austria

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Australia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Azerbaijan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Bahamas

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Bahrain

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Bangladesh

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Barbados

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Belarus

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Belgium

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Belize

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Benin

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Bermuda[1]

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Bolivia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Bosnia &Herzegovina

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Botswana

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Brazil

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

British Virgin Islands[1]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

Brunei

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Bulgaria

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Burkina Faso

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Burma

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Burundi

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

N

N

Y

N

Cambodia

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Cameroon

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Canada

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Cape Verde

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Cayman Islands[1]

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Central African Rep.

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Chad

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Chile

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

China

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

N

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Colombia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Comoros

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Congo, Dem Rep. of

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Congo, Rep. of

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Cook Islands

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Costa Rica

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Cote d’Ivoire

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Croatia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Cuba

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Curacao[2]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Cyprus[3]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Czech Republic

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

 

Denmark

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Djibouti

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Dominica

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

 

Dominican Republic

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Ecuador

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Egypt

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

El Salvador

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Equatorial Guinea

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

 

Eritrea

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y*

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

N

N

N

Y

 

Estonia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Ethiopia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

 

Fiji

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

 

Finland

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

France

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Gabon

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Gambia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

N

 

Georgia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Germany

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

 

Ghana

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

N

 

Gibraltar[1]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

N

 

Greece

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Grenada

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

 

Guatemala

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

 

Guernsey[1]

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

 

Guinea

Y

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

 

Guinea-Bissau

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

 

Guyana

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Haiti

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Holy See

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Honduras

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Hong Kong[4]

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Hungary

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Iceland

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

India

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Indonesia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Iran

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y*

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Iraq

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Ireland

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Isle of Man[1]

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Israel

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Italy

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Jamaica

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Japan

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

Jersey[1]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Jordan

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Kazakhstan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Kenya

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Kosovo

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Kuwait

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Kyrgyz Republic

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Laos

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Latvia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Lebanon

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Lesotho

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Liberia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Libya

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y*

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Liechtenstein

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Lithuania

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Luxembourg

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Macau[4]

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Macedonia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Madagascar

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Malawi

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Malaysia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Maldives

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

N

N

N

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Mali

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Malta

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Marshall Islands

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Mauritania

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Mauritius

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Mexico

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Micronesia, FS

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Moldova

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Monaco

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Mongolia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Montenegro

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Montserrat[1]

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Morocco

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Mozambique

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Nauru

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

N

N

Nepal

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y*

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Netherlands

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

New Zealand

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Nicaragua

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Niger

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y*

N

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Nigeria

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Niue

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

North Korea

Y

Y

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Y

N

N

N

Y

Norway

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Oman

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Pakistan

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Palau

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

N

N

Panama

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Papua New Guinea

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Y

N

Y

N

Paraguay

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Peru

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Philippines

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Poland

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Portugal

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Qatar

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Romania

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Russia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Rwanda

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

St. Kitts & Nevis

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

St. Lucia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

N

St. Maarten

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

St. Vincent & the Grenadines

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Samoa

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

San Marino

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Sao Tome & Principe

Y

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Saudi Arabia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Senegal

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Serbia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Seychelles

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Sierra Leone

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Singapore

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Slovak Republic

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Slovenia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Solomon Islands

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

Somalia

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

South Africa

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

South Korea

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

South Sudan

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

Spain

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Sri Lanka

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Sudan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Suriname

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Swaziland

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Sweden

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Switzerland

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Syria

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Taiwan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

N

N

Tajikistan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Tanzania

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Thailand

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Timor-Leste

N

N

Y

N

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

N

Togo

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Tonga

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Trinidad and Tobago

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Tunisia

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Turkey

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Turkmenistan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Turks & Caicos[1]

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Uganda

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Ukraine

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

UAE

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

United Kingdom

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Uruguay

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Uzbekistan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Vanuatu

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Venezuela

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Vietnam

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

N

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Yemen

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Zambia

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Zimbabwe

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y*

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

 

 

==

Bribery Law – US

  • 18 U.S.C. § 201 – Bribery of Public Officials and Witnesses
  • Bribery – DefinitionThe offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of something of value for the purpose of influencing the action of an official in the discharge of his or her public or legal duties.
  • Bribery – Modern LawModern statutes, state and federal, have four common characteristics. (1) They apply equally to receivers and givers. (2) They are comprehensive, including as officials all employees of government and those acting in a government capacity, such as jurors and legislators. More recent statutes include party officials and even party employees. (3) They treat bribery as a crime that can be committed by the briber even though the bribee is not influenced. (4) They treat bribery as a felony.
  • OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business TransactionsThe OECD Anti-Bribery Convention establishes legally binding standards to criminalise bribery of foreign public officials in international business transactions and provides for a host of related measures that make this effective. The 30 OECD member countries and eight non-member countries – Argentina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Estonia, Israel, the Slovenia and South Africa – have adopted this Convention (Entry into force and Status of ratification).
  • Office of Government Ethics (OGE)The Office of Government Ethics (OGE), a small agency within the executive branch, was established by the Ethics in Government Act of 1978. Originally part of the Office of Personnel Management, OGE became a separate agency on October 1, 1989 as part of the Office of Government Ethics Reauthorization Act of 1988. The Office of Government Ethics exercises leadership in the executive branch to prevent conflicts of interest on the part of Government employees, and to resolve those conflicts of interest that do occur. In partnership with executive branch agencies and departments, OGE fosters high ethical standards for employees and strengthens the public’s confidence that the Government’s business is conducted with impartiality and integrity.
  • The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act – Department of JusticeThe Department of Justice is responsible for all criminal enforcement and for civil enforcement of the antibribery provisions with respect to domestic concerns and foreign companies and nationals. The SEC is responsible for civil enforcement of the antibribery provisions with respect to issuers.

Bribery Law – Europe

  • Bribery Bill – UKThe purpose of the Bill is to: Reform the criminal law to provide a new, modern and comprehensive scheme of bribery offences that will enable the courts and prosecutors to provide a more effective response to bribery in the 21st century at home and abroad.
  • Criminal Law Convention on Corruption – Council of EuropeThe Council of Europe has developed a number of multifaceted legal instruments dealing with matters such as the criminalisation of corruption in the public and private sectors, liability and compensation for damage caused by corruption, conduct of public officials and the financing of political parties. These instruments are aimed at improving the capacity of States to fight corruption domestically as well as at international level. The monitoring of compliance with these standards is entrusted to the Group of States against Corruption, GRECO.
  • Law on Bribery – UKOn 20 November 2008 we published our final report on bribery. Our recommendations include replacing the existing law with two general offences of bribery and one specific offence of bribing a foreign public official. We also recommend a new corporate offence of negligently failing to prevent bribery.
  • OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions – EuropeIn recognition of the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions and the 1997 Revised Recommendation (OECD Convention), the Members of the OECD Working Party on Export Credits and Credit Guarantees (ECG) agreed in November 2000 on the Action Statement on Bribery and officially supported Export Credits (Action Statement).

Bribery Law – International

  • Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (CFPOA) – CanadaWithin Canada, the federal government seeks to prevent and prohibit potential domestic corruption by a combination of federal statutes, parliamentary rules and administrative provisions. The Criminal Code includes offences which prohibit bribery, frauds on the government and influence peddling, fraud or a breach of trust in connection with duties of office, municipal corruption, selling or purchasing office, influencing or negotiating appointments or dealing in offices, possession of property or proceeds obtained by crime, fraud, laundering proceeds of crime and secret commissions.
  • Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) – UHY AdvisorsAs international trade has increased, so too has the importance of complying with laws governing international business. Combating corruption has become an international priority with all governments maintaining a vigilant stance to weed out the corruption that has historically been endemic in international business practice. In the past, a company was able to shield itself from prosecution because bad actors were merely contractors or other indirect agents of the company. However, amplified enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act makes that approach no longer viable.
  • United Nations Convention against CorruptionIn its resolution 55/61 of 4 December 2000, the General Assembly recognized No Bribes that an effective international legal instrument against corruption, independent of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (resolution 55/25, annex I) was desirable. As a result, it decided to establish an ad hoc committee for the negotiation of such an instrument in Vienna, which is where UNODC headquarters are located.

Organizations Related to Bribery Law

  • BRIBEline: Business Registry for International Bribery and ExtortionBRIBEline’s purpose is to collect information about the official or quasi-official entities – governments, international organizations, security forces, state-owned enterprises, etc. – around the world that solicit bribes. BRIBEline focuses on demand-side bribery only; we do not request or collect information about those who pay, or offer to pay, bribes.
  • Council of Europe – Group of States against Corruption (GRECO)Ever since antiquity, corruption has been one of the most widespread and insidious of social evils. When it involves public officials and elected representatives, it is inimical to the administration of public affairs. Since the end of the 19th century, it has also been seen as a major threat in the private sphere, undermining the trust and confidence which are necessary for the maintenance and development of sustainable economic and social relations. It is estimated that hundreds of billions of Euros are paid in bribes every year.
  • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC)The Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) was created by the ICAC Act 1988. Its aims are to protect the public interest, prevent breaches of public trust and guide the conduct of public officials.
  • TRACE International, Inc. (TRACE)TRACE International, Inc. (TRACE) is a non-profit membership association that pools resources to provide practical and cost-effective anti-bribery compliance solutions for multinational companies and their commercial intermediaries (sales agents and representatives, consultants, distributors, suppliers, etc.).
  • Transparency InternationalTransparency International, the global civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption, brings people together in a powerful worldwide coalition to end the devastating impact of corruption on men, women and children around the world. TI’s mission is to create change towards a world free of corruption.
  • U.S. Securities and Exchange CommissionThe mission of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is to protect investors, maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets, and facilitate capital formation. As more and more first-time investors turn to the markets to help secure their futures, pay for homes, and send children to college, our investor protection mission is more compelling than ever. As our nation’s securities exchanges mature into global for-profit competitors, there is even greater need for sound market regulation.
  • United Nations Action against Corruption and BriberySeveral questions arise in connection with the increased interest in action against corruption at both the national and international levels. In such interest due to the higher occurrence of corrupt practices, higher detection rates or lower levels of (public, official and business) tolerance? The available evidence suggests that the answer may lie in a combination of these explanations. If each of them is examined separately, it will be easier to understand not only the eruption of scandals, but also the explosion of anti-corruption sentiments and how the two can be mutually reinforcing.

Publications Related to Bribery Law

  • Business Link – Ethical Trading – Avoid Corruption and Bribery OverseasAn essential element of corporate social responsibility is honest and transparent trading. Bribery and corruption create a disincentive to trade as well as uneven trading conditions that can damage economic systems and the individuals within them.
  • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) – PublicationsThe Independent Commission Against Corruption publishes investigation reports and corruption prevention resource materials on a variety of topics. ICAC publications and other resource materials are available on this site and can be downloaded free of charge. For information on the outcome of ICAC investigations, including recommendations relating to prosecution, disciplinary action and corruption prevention, go to Investigation outcomes.

Articles on HG.org Related to Bribery Law

  • What Is Blackmail?
    Blackmail is characterized as a crime and in some cases a tort that involves revealing personal information about someone as a threat or threatening other conduct to get the person to do something that the offender wants completed. Like extortion, blackmail seeks to remove a person’s free will to conduct some action. Committing black mail can carry significant criminal and civil consequences.
  • Hiring Children of Foreign Officials May Expose Bank to Bribery Charges
    America’s largest banking institution is facing charges under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for a practice of hiring the children of foreign officials. The case will test how broadly the federal law can be applied to practices as common as hiring an influential person’s children in order to gain a small advantage in negotiations.
  • What Do I Do If There Is A Warrant Out For My Arrest?
    It may seem as though you are standing at the edge of a cliff and are getting ready to fall off, or maybe the feeling you are getting is one of claustrophobia, or something much worse. When the biggest concern on your mind is “what do I do if I have a warrant of arrest” issued for me, the first response should be to find a good lawyer and get some help.
  • What are White Collar Crimes?
    A question we get asked on our website all the time is, what are white collar crimes? With the rise in today’s technology it’s highly likely that you or someone you know has been a victim of a white collar crime from counterfeit currency to identity theft. Continue reading this article to understand more about the most popular forms of white collar crimes.
  • Hiring a Kansas City Criminal Defense Lawyer – What You Should Expect
    If you have been charged with or accused of a crime, it is important that you consult with a talented Kansas City criminal defense lawyer right away. An effective, skilled attorney can have a substantial impact on the outcome of your case.
  • When Does Your Desire for Revenge Become Blackmail
    Often, after a bad breakup, people react badly and may engage in behavior that is not in their best interests. They may attempt to “seek revenge” against the ex they believe has caused them pain and/or harm. This is especially prevalent when you or your ex believes that there is a debt owed. The wronged party may try to use personal information about the other party to illicit the money or reciprocity for their perceived wrong. It is important to realize that this can be classified as blackmail.
  • Criminal Defense in Illinois
    For those who have never before faced criminal charges, an arrest can be a frightening experience. The stress and anxiety of an arrest may cause you, your family members or friends to overlook important factors, such as the right to remain silent and the right to consult with a lawyer.
  • Drug Charges and Their Defense
    Drug offenses come in many varieties with one common factor, the penalties for a conviction are severe and may result in lengthy prison sentences and fines. An aggressive defense is necessary. Review this article related to drug charges and their defense.
  • DWI Laws: Do they violate the Constitution’s Protections Against Unreasonable Search and Seizure?
    Can you be compelled to provide a sample of blood breath or urine for testing or rbe charged with a crime for a refusal? Why are the DWI laws allowed to skirt constitutional protections against unreasonable search and seizure by requiring a warrantless search? Review this article to see how the laws have come under attack.
  • DWI: The Wizard, the Oracle and the Intoxilyzer Source Code
    In 2008, challenges to the DWI laws are louting. Now more than ever, there a re viable defenses to basic substance of DWI law. With regard to breath testing, increasingly, the Intoxilyzer 5000 and it s source code have come under attack. Review this article regarding that defense.
  • All Criminal Law ArticlesArticles written by attorneys and experts worldwide discussing legal aspects related to Criminal Law including: arson, assault, battery, bribery, burglary, child abuse, child pornography, computer crime, controlled substances, credit card fraud, criminal defense, criminal law, drugs and narcotics, DUI, DWI, embezzlement, fraud, expungements, felonies, homicide, identity theft, manslaughter, money laundering, murder, perjury, prostitution, rape, RICO, robbery, sex crimes, shoplifting, theft, weapons, white collar crime and wire fraud.

==

Money: learn to live decently with very little and be part of your community to give and receive help when needed; Sex: learn more about relationship to have all you need/want/is healthy; Power: study ethics to avoid abuses because they will turn against you and destroy you in the end. I would add Food: study nutrition and stay healthy.

 
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: